pembroke welsh corgi club of the garden state

The Pembroke Welsh Corgi Club of the Garden State

pembroke welsh corgi club of the garden state

pembroke welsh corgi club of the garden state

The Pembroke Welsh Corgi Club
of the Garden State

 

contact us

pembroke welsh corgi club of the garden state

herding instinct test

Saturday
April 8, 2017

8:30am to 2:30pm


25 Stokes Rd.
Shamong, NJ

  • Entries limited to 24 dogs
  • Cost: $50 per dog
  • Pre-entry only
  • All entries close Friday, March 24
  • Pembroke Welsh Corgis will have preference of entry until Friday, March 10 (see below for details)
Stock: Well dog-broke mixed breed sheep
Tester: Katherine Spence

Entry Form
Download the entry form for the herding instinct test.
This form must be used to submit your entry!

Pembroke Welsh Corgis from PWCCGS members will have preference of entry until Friday, March 3, 2017. Pembroke Welsh Corgis from non-members that have not previously participated in our herding instinct test will then have preference until Friday, March 10, 2017, after which entries will be taken from any herding breed in order of postmarked date on the entry.

All entries close on Friday, March 24, 2017.

QUESTIONS

See our list of Frequently Asked Questions or our list of Common Herding Terms

Contact Sally Felix, chair of this event, with any specific questions or concerns.
(home: 609-530-0504 ; cell: 605-261-8239)

  • Dogs must be at least 6 months old to participate.
  • For the Herding Instinct Test, dogs need have NO training on stock.
  • Any dog endangering stock by biting or excessive chasing will be excused.
  • Any dog showing aggression toward people in or out of the ring will be asked to leave the grounds.
  • All dogs must have proof of current rabies vaccination available for inspection if requested.
  • Bitches in heat may take part in the test, but must wait until all other dogs have participated.
  • Dogs must be on leash at all times except while competing.
  • For their safety, children must be under supervision at all times, and not allowed to run around the farm or climb on fences or equipment. Unruly children will be asked to leave the grounds.
  • You will be assigned a fifteen-minute time period. Please check your confirmation and be on time.
  • We strongly suggest you plan to arrive at least 30 minutes before your scheduled time, to allow for schedule changes due to absences and dogs who do not use their entire 15 minute allotted time.

ENTRY FORM

Download a PDF of the entry form for the herding instinct test. This form must be used to submit your entry and it must be signed by all adults attendng. A parent or guardian must sign for any minors who will be participating.

If you don't have Acrobat Reader, you can download a free copy by clicking here.

DIRECTIONS

  • NJ Turnpike South to Exit #7/BORDENTOWN/TRENTON US-206 South
  • Go 8.3 miles south of the Red Lion Circle (i.e., the intersection of Rt 206 and Rt 70).
  • Turn right toward Medford onto Stokes Rd (also called Rt 541).
  • House is third on left. Brown house with a brown fence that goes right up to the road

The following dogs passed in 2016:

DOG OWNER
Donny
Annabelle Aispuro
Winston
Brandon Pfeffer
Milo
Ashley & Craig Huber
Mugen
Candace Hinton
Callie
Jessica Matlosz
Odin
Rachel Bradley
Bennie
Amoreena Paciunas
Milo
Zichen Wang
Drewbert
Jialu Wang
Darcy
Linda Proctor
Cookie
Zichen Wang
Pippen
Jessica Hulen
Dice
Joanne VonEssen
Gator
Linda Wisniewski
Dart
Andrea Kozma
Leia
Catherine Barreto
Tyler
Diana Zipperer

For those of you who like to keep track of how we do, our history is shown below:

Event Ran Pass % Pass
4/10/16
25
17
68%
3/28/15
23
20
87%
3/29/14
18
15
83%
4/06/13
20
13
65%
11/05/11
10
6
60%
11/06/10
23
13
57%
11/09/09
22
15
68%
10/28/08
20
16
80%
10/27/07
19
15
79%
10/28/06
19
15
79%
10/29/05
28
21
75%
10/23/04
27
20
74%
11/1/03
26
20
77%
11/2/02
28
19
68%
11/3/01
27
19
70%
11/4/00
28
15
54%
11/6/99
27
20
74%
10/31/98
26
18
69%
11/1/97
25
17
68%
11/2/96
24
15
63%
4/1/95
20
17
85%
11/4/95
25
17
68%

Commonly Used Herding Terms

Style

Gathering: a style of bring animals to the handler, sometimes called “fetching”, or, in Australian usage, “heading”.
Driving: taking the livestock away from the handler, or from one side to another at right angles to the handler, either naturally or upon direction from the handler to do so.

Approach

Approach: the manner in which the dog comes in to the stock, a “smooth” approach being most highly prized, that is, the dog moves very steadily and surely without bounding around, weaving or jumping in aggressively.
Wide Running: a dog that makes wide passes around the stock, naturally keeping a good distant off the stock.
Close Running: a dog that runs in very close to the stock, trying to get as close as possible as it passes off the stock.

Wearing

Wearing: the side-to-side movement of the dog, in a pendulum motion or half-circle pattern, to keep the herd or flock grouped.

Bark

Force Barking: the dog generally works quietly, but in situations where the stock challenges the dog, the dog barks as a pre-curser to a nip.

Eye

Eye: an intense gaze used by the dog to control the stock, often accompanied by a creeping or crouching approach to the animals.
Strong-Eyed: shows the above qualities to a marked degree.
Medium-Eyed: showing the “eye” but without the crouching approach.
Loose-Eyed: a dog does not show an intense gaze at all times in the stock; such dogs may glance around or at the handler from time to time.

Power

Power: strong self-confidence; a dog with power can move stubborn or fighting animals, often without nipping.
Weak: lacking confidence to stand up to stubborn stock; such dogs often turn tail to run away when confronted with a challenge from the stock.

Heading: nipping at the heads of livestock to turn them.

Heeling: nipping at the lower part of the hind legs of livestock to move them forward.

Wool-pulling: nipping or gripping at the bodies of sheep, marking the flesh by tearing out hunks of wool (called “body biting” on cattle); biting at the body of any type of stock is a fault.

Outrun: the dog leaves the handler’s side and move around to the other side of stock located some distance away.

Lift: the approach to the stock to start it moving after completion of the initial outrun.

Fetch: the dog moves the stock toward the handles.

Gather: the entire outrun/lift/fetch.

Balance: the position taken by the dog, well back from the stock, which enables the dog to control the direction of the stock and cover any attempts by the stock to break away.

“Go By”: the traditional Scottish command to direct the dog to move clockwise around the stock.

“Way To Me”: the traditional Scottish command to direct the dog to move counter-clockwise around the stock.

Adapted from the Pembroke Welsh Corgi Club of America
“Herding Instinct Certification Program” (May 15, 1998)

PWCCGS Herding Instinct Test Frequently Asked Questions

Q: What training or experience does my dog need? It has never seen sheep.

A: No prior experience or training is required. However, your dog must be able to run for 5 minutes.

Q: Do I need to participate?

A: Yes, you will be in the ring with the dog.

Q: What training or experience do I need? We do not own sheep.

A: No prior experience or training is required.

Q: Why is the test conducted?

A: Many Corgis have a natural herding instinct. Corgis were originally bred to herd cattle. This test is a way to determine the strength of the inborn instinct in your Corgi or other herding breed of dog.

Q: How is the test conducted?

A: You and your dog (on a leash) are placed in a pen at least 50 feet in diameter with 3 sheep, the Tester, and a stockdog (frequently a Border Collie) which helps the Tester manage the sheep between dogs, and during if necessary, for a maximum of 15 minutes. Your dog must herd the sheep for a total of 5 minutes. If your dog does not show interest, you will be encouraged to 'herd' or chase the sheep to show the dog how.

Q: Is the test strenuous for the dog?

A: The dog must be able run for 5 minutes. If your dog is overweight or out of shape, this can be difficult.

Q: Is the test strenuous for the handler?

A: You will be in the ring, working alonside your dog. You will need to be able to keep up with your dog and with the sheep and, at times, to help your dog work the stock.

Q: Is the test cancelled if it rains?

A: No, the test is held rain or shine.

Q: Can I receive a refund if I can not attend?

A: No refunds are provided.

Q: How often do you hold the test?

A: The PWCCGS typically sponsors a Herding Instinct Test twice a year, usually in spring and fall. Other breed or performance clubs may hold herding instinct tests at other times of the year.

Q: Can I enter again next year if my dog does NOT pass?

A: Yes, you may enter as often as you like.

Q: Can I enter again next year if my dog does pass?

A: Yes, you may enter as often as you like.

Q: Do I have to be a member of your club to participate in the test?

A: No, the test is open to all Pembroke Welsh Corgis, 6 months or older, and to all other herding breeds, 6 months or older, after the specified preference date for Pembroke Welsh Corgis.

Q: I am the dog's owner, can my son or daughter handle the dog?

A: Yes, anyone over the age of 12 may act as a handler.

pembroke welsh corgi club of the garden state

 home |  about PWCCGS |  meetings |  membership |  officers & board |  committees
pembroke welsh corgi rescue | pembroke welsh corgi puppies |  calendar of events |  2013 specialty 
agility trial |  funday sunday |  match show |  match results | herding instinct test
pembroke welsh corgi breeders |  newsletter ways&means | members only
contact the webmaster